Cybersecurity is a blanket term that refers to the range of protocols and technologies used to protect data and the systems in which it is stored and transmitted. Securing your digital assets isn’t just smart, it’s essential. A comprehensive cybersecurity plan starts by considering several primary factors, both physical and intangible.

1. End-user Education

The human component of cybersecurity plays a large part in an organization’s risk profile. Ensuring all employees are aware of and following cybersecurity best practices goes a long way in protecting your business’s data and interests. Strong, unique passwords across all network devices are one of the first lines of defense against a potential data breach. Your team should also be well-versed in identifying phishing emails and risky websites.

In some cases, there is also an additional layer of industry-specific standards by which your business and employees must abide. Healthcare and accounting companies, for example, need to ensure that their cybersecurity protocols meet or exceed the minimum safeguard requirements for HIPAA and SOC compliance. Even businesses outside of these trades need to pay close attention to the cybersecurity practices of their employees. Though you may not be in healthcare or finance, you likely accept payment for your products or services and have employee financial information stored electronically. A single individual could be the difference between continued security or a data breach.

2. Physical Security

There are numerous ways in which the physical components of your business’s network need to be properly protected. Individuals who would seek to do your business harm frequently rely on remote access attempts, but they also have an opportunity to compromise your data if your network’s hardware is not appropriately secured. Both your organization and large-scale data centers should have a comprehensive security plan in place. Depending upon the size of the business, this could include such measures as door controls, video surveillance, and even biometric access management.

Damage to your network’s hardware can be equally detrimental to your business’s operations. Backups and redundancies play a part in your physical cybersecurity as much as they do the digital component. In the event of a compromised or irreparably damaged device, offsite backups can quickly and easily restore your lost data with limited downtime. The data centers upon which your business likely relies also have plans in place to help avoid risk to your data in the event of fire or water damage in their facilities.

3. Internet of Things (IoT) Risk Mitigation

Internet-connected appliances, printers, and wearable technology can certainly make our lives easier, but also represent a growing list of cybersecurity vulnerabilities. These devices often come with little in the way of pre-existing security measures, and inconsistently offer security updates or upgrades. For this reason, it is important to pay close attention to what devices are being granted access to your network.

For some organizations, IoT connection is non-optional. Essential manufacturing equipment, for example, is a common target of malicious actors. If you do choose to allow this kind of connectivity within your business, you must establish and enforce a set of best practices from the outset. Weigh the convenience or necessity of such devices against the potential risk, and take steps to bring your internal IoT into alignment with the rest of your cybersecurity measures.

4. Network & Cloud Security

When you schedule an IT assessment with Tech Allies, we start by evaluating your current cybersecurity protocols and assess the overall risk profile for your organization. From there, we suggest and implement solutions to fill the gaps we identified in our initial assessment. We then provide round-the-clock support for you and your team both remotely and in-person, when necessary. Our flat-rate plans are tailored specifically to your needs and afford you the peace of mind you deserve.

For some organizations, IoT connection is non-optional. Essential manufacturing equipment, for example, is a common target of malicious actors. If you do choose to allow this kind of connectivity within your business, you must establish and enforce a set of best practices from the outset. Weigh the convenience or necessity of such devices against the potential risk, and take steps to bring your internal IoT into alignment with the rest of your cybersecurity measures.

We are passionate about providing world-class IT service to the people of Lincoln, Nebraska. Let us take on the burden of your cybersecurity plan so that you can focus attention on your clients. Our IT assessments are totally free and zero-obligation—give us a call or schedule online to start your business on its way to worry-free cybersecurity with Tech Allies.